Keep Pets Safe on Valentine's Day

Keep Pets Safe on Valentine's Day

Valentine’s Day is a day set aside to show the people around us how much we care for them. Unfortunately, some of the most common gifts given on Valentine’s Day can be dangerous for our pets.

Chocolate

A heart-shaped box of chocolates is a classic Valentine’s Day gift. Most people know that chocolate is toxic to both cats and dogs. Although cats are seldom tempted to partake, it is common for dogs to consume chocolates – sometimes wrappers and all. Eating chocolate can cause vomiting, diarrhea, tremors, abnormally high heart rates and seizures.

The darker the chocolate, the more harmful it is. Baking chocolate is the most toxic. Be sure your sweetheart keeps the chocolate out of reach of pets.

If your pet eats chocolate, call your vet or poison control immediately. They will want to know how much and what kind of chocolate your pet ate to determine the proper course of action.

Flowers

Who doesn’t love a big bouquet of beautiful flowers on Valentine’s Day? Lilies, a popular choice in mixed arrangements, are toxic to cats. Even a nibble can cause kidney failure and even death. Symptoms of lily poisoning include dehydration, lack of appetite, drooling, vomiting, lethargy and tremors.

If you suspect your cat ingested lilies, call your vet or go to an emergency clinic immediately. The window of opportunity for medical help is often less than a day. Instead of trying to keep arrangements with lilies away from cats, stick with the traditional bouquet of roses (but keep pets away from those thorns!).

Candles

Nothing ruins the romance of a candlelit dinner more than a cat’s paws or a dog’s nose getting burned, or worse yet a tablecloth catching on fire. The flickering of a flame is tempting to inquisitive or playful pets. Never leave candles burning in an unsupervised room.

Check out the new battery-operated candles with ‘flames’ that look so real, the romance will burn brightly without the risk.

Stuffed Teddy Bears

A teddy bear often accompanies candy and/or flowers. Dogs can’t always tell the difference between their toys and ours. Stuffed animals are easily torn open, exposing their stuffing. If eaten, the stuffing can cause intestinal blockages. Symptoms of intestinal blockage include vomiting, lack of appetite, lethargy, inability to poop and unwillingness to lie down. Partial blockages can cause similar symptoms plus burping and diarrhea.

Call your vet if you suspect your pet has eaten stuffing. An X-ray or ultrasound may be recommended.

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Thursday

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Saturday

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Sunday

CLOSED

Hampshire Office

Monday
8:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Wednesday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Thursday
8:00 am - 7:00 pm
Friday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday
8:00 am - 12:00 pm
Sunday
CLOSED

Gilberts Office

Monday
8:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Wednesday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Thursday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Friday
8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday
8:00 am - 12:00 pm
Sunday
CLOSED

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